RE: 50 YEARS

#16 by scarbelly ( Guest ) , Mon Apr 23, 2012 3:58 pm

Brings back memories, spent my early teenage years playing and exploring round Coleshill. We either used to get the bus by the Toby Jug, bike it, and even walk and spend nearly all day up there. If the weather was hot we would play in the Blythe down by Cuttle Mill. If I remember right there used to be an ice cream/tea van parked there.

scarbelly

RE: 50 YEARS

#17 by Frothy , Mon Apr 23, 2012 6:24 pm

Zitat von scarbelly
Brings back memories, spent my early teenage years playing and exploring round Coleshill. We either used to get the bus by the Toby Jug, bike it, and even walk and spend nearly all day up there. If the weather was hot we would play in the Blythe down by Cuttle Mill. If I remember right there used to be an ice cream/tea van parked there.



Last time I went to the Blythe ford about 10 years ago, there was a burnt out boat on a trailer there. I've never been there since.


 
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RE: 50 YEARS

#18 by Sistersue , Wed Apr 25, 2012 9:58 pm

My other half was born and bred in Coleshill, ho loves the pics, thanks Chocks.
I used to go there as a child for the Father Hudsons sumer fete, my great aunts were devout catholics and used to knit all year round for it.
I have fond memories of it too, it's where I met Mick, having got a job at St Gerard, one of the few places that didn't penalise me for being a single mom.
Was there yesterday at a funeral for a friends dad and hadn't realised till then how lovely the graveyard and church grounds are.
Sue

 
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RE: 50 YEARS

#19 by chocks , Sat Apr 28, 2012 5:11 pm

Glad you both liked the pic's. It's a different place now to what it was but they call it progress so who am I to argue?

 
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RE: 50 YEARS

#20 by Sistersue , Sun Apr 29, 2012 6:55 pm

Not always a good thing though,this progress!! We got to talking about the Father Hudsons complex and my friend kate, who has lived in Coleshill for about 40 years, was saying how it looks so sad now, with broken windows and everywhere overgrown, seems such a shame, the buildings are lovely inside.
Dad also remembers Coleshill, he worked for Walkers construction for many years on and off and did a lot of work in Coleshill.
Sue


 
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RE: 50 YEARS

#21 by chocks , Sun Apr 29, 2012 7:05 pm

I agree with you about Father Hudsons. It's falling down but sadley so are all the Walkers Homes. Our house was built by walkers and I won't bore you with all the faults but our stairs have fallen down and you can see daylight under the window sills to name but two. No wonder they went bust.

This is about the only part of Father Hudsons that's still in good condition

father hudsons 2.JPG - Bild entfernt (keine Rechte)

 
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RE: 50 YEARS

#22 by Sistersue , Sun Apr 29, 2012 7:15 pm

Yes, Walkers were either great or lousy - I can remember dad tearing his hair out when they went onto piece work and time limits, he always says a job worth doing is worth doing well, so it went against the grain for him to cut corners to save time, but that wasn't what the youngsters wanted, all they were bothered about was the cash in their pockets. Will have to tell him he was right about some of the cowboy work not lasting! Do you live in Coleshill? Mind I hav eto say old Mr Walker was very generous when I moved back up here, as a single mom with two youngsters, he supplied the paint and door furniture for my house when dad told him what had happened.
Sue


 
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RE: 50 YEARS

#23 by chocks , Sun Apr 29, 2012 7:36 pm

Yes Sue, I live in Coleshill. On the Norton Leas estate of Station rd.

 
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RE: 50 YEARS

#24 by Frothy , Thu May 31, 2012 6:30 am

Were you around these days Chocks ............

Coleshill began life in the Iron Age, before the Roman Conquest of 43 AD, as the Grimstock Hill Romano-British settlement, north of the River Cole. Evidence of Hut Circles was found by archaeologists at the end of the 1970s. These excavations showed that throughout the Roman period there was a Romano-Celtic temple on Grimstock Hill. It had developed over the earlier Iron Age huts and had gone through at least three phases of development. The area was at the junction of two powerful Celtic Tribes - the Coritanii to the east from Leicester, and to the west the Cornovii from Wroxeter.

In the post Roman or Arthurian period (The Dark Ages) the nucleus of Coleshill moved about a kilometre to the south - to the top of the hill. Here the present church is set and the medieval town developed around it. By 1066 the town was a Royal Manor held by King Edward the Confessor and is recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as land held by William the Conqueror. Henry II granted the manor to the de Clinton family, then it passed to the de Montford's who had moated manor houses at Coleshill and Kingshurst. King Henry VII granted the lands to Simon Digby in 1496. His descendants (Wingfield-Digby) still hold the titles.

Coleshill was granted a Market Charter by King John in 1207, alongside Liverpool, Leek and Great Yarmouth.

During the Coaching Trade and the Turnpike Trusts Coleshill became important as a major staging post on the coaching roads from London to Holyhead and from London to Chester to Liverpool. At one point there were over twenty inns in the town. The Coleshill to Lichfield Turnpike dates from 1743.


http://www.thewellingtonrealale.co.uk/pages/beerboard.php

 
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RE: 50 YEARS

#25 by Frothy , Tue Jun 26, 2012 8:43 am

Coleshill 1928



Acknowledgment to www.britainfromabove.org.uk


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Last edited 06.26.2012 | Top

RE: 50 YEARS

#26 by chocks , Wed Jun 27, 2012 5:03 pm

Great pic that is Frothy. It amazing hom much Coleshill has canged over the years.
There is a row of buildings bottom right which are exactly the same today (It's Church Hill) but behind them there is a building on it's own. That was in what was known then as Clock Yard but now it is where my daughters house is.
Thanks for posting it mate.

 
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RE: 50 YEARS

#27 by Mr T ( deleted ) , Sat Jul 21, 2012 7:37 am

This building is on the Birmingham Rd between Bacons End and Coleshill. Was it called Coleshill Hall? It has been derelict for years, does anyone know what's to become of it. Perhaps Chocks may know. I do remember when it was in use because when we used to cycle to Coleshill we would stop on the bridge thats there for 5 minutes.

Terrycoleshill hall (1).JPG - Bild entfernt (keine Rechte)coleshill hall (2).JPG - Bild entfernt (keine Rechte)

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RE: 50 YEARS

#28 by chocks , Sat Jul 21, 2012 9:26 am

The sadest building in Coleshill Terry. Such a shame to watch it fall apart.
Little is known about the place but I'll tell you what I do know.
Originally the land was owned by the Wingfield-Digby's who lived in Coleshill Hall up on the Hill behind the farm. It was sold to the current owners family in 1870 as a small holding.
The building that you see in your picture was built c1920 by the father of the current owner. To the best of my knowledge it was always a poultry farm.
The chap who owns it now is in his late 80's and refuses to sell the land or allow redevelopement. He abandoned the house sometime in the 1970's but allowed farm labourers the use of an upstairs room for some time after.
In the mid 1980's the owner and a friend decided to convert the property into a hotel. Work began but the project was quickly abandoned (no one knows why) and vandals then moved in a wrecked the place leaving it in the state you see today.
No one has used the building for about 20 yrs now but there are 3 small barns at the back of it which are used by Colshill Hall Estate Managers.
The Owner has no family to pass it on to, so when he goes maybe something will be done with it, probably demolition bucause I would guess that it is now beyond repair.
I drive passed the place every night on the way home from work and it breaks my heart to see such a beautiful building just falling apart. It really is sad to see!

 
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RE: 50 YEARS

#29 by Sistersue , Sat Jul 21, 2012 1:16 pm

Chocks, it is sad to see, bet it was a lovely place when it was up and running.
Hubby says he used to work picking potatos there when he was at school, that would have been late 70's, early 80's, he recalls there being an Arab stallion in the stables and some cows too. He also thought there were two daughters of the owner, but maybe they have pre-deceased their father.
Sue


 
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RE: 50 YEARS

#30 by chocks , Sat Jul 21, 2012 5:26 pm

Sue. Your hubby may well be right about daughters. What I was told is that there is no son to pass it on to. Perhaps the daughters are not interested. And he would be right about cattle being there because I also remember them but I think that there was only a few. It was predominately a poultry farm due to it being built on the flood plane, the one end of the building is still full of coops and cages.
I know that there were a few young farmers and farm hands there in the 70''s and 80's who tried to make a go of it but none were successful.

 
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